Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I don’t feel that rich.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by HikingDO View Post
    The last time I went through a McDonald’s drive through, they asked me if I wanted to supersize my order, and I said “yes” without blinking an eye. Felt like a baller…
    That's how the hedonic treadmill catches you. Start with the supersized fries, end with the megamansion and private jet!
    Last edited by artemis; 09-27-2021, 06:47 PM.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by artemis View Post

      That's how the hedonic treadmill catches you. Start with the supersized fried, end with the megamansion and private jet!
      And the alternative might actually be your kids inherit the ability to have the megamansion and private jet! Unintended consequences.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by artemis View Post

        That's how the hedonic treadmill catches you. Start with the supersized fries, end with the megamansion and private jet!
        Our society does make it hard sometimes. Here is a recent example in my life. A former colleague of mine recently bought a million dollar, 6000SF house in a community my wife and I are interested in for retirement. Having passed on the opportunity, I can say with certainty that I have no interest in a house that large for retirement. It is just the two of them. Very nice houses at 3000SF go for $600K in that community. My read: Crazy waste of money. Other friends in the community read was: Wow, he must be doing really well. Maybe that was the point?

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Larry Ragman View Post

          Our society does make it hard sometimes. Here is a recent example in my life. A former colleague of mine recently bought a million dollar, 6000SF house in a community my wife and I are interested in for retirement. Having passed on the opportunity, I can say with certainty that I have no interest in a house that large for retirement. It is just the two of them. Very nice houses at 3000SF go for $600K in that community. My read: Crazy waste of money. Other friends in the community read was: Wow, he must be doing really well. Maybe that was the point?
          It's amazing how much money we can spend trying to impress other people (who usually aren't as impressed as we think they will be).

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Larry Ragman View Post

            Our society does make it hard sometimes. Here is a recent example in my life. A former colleague of mine recently bought a million dollar, 6000SF house in a community my wife and I are interested in for retirement. Having passed on the opportunity, I can say with certainty that I have no interest in a house that large for retirement. It is just the two of them. Very nice houses at 3000SF go for $600K in that community. My read: Crazy waste of money. Other friends in the community read was: Wow, he must be doing really well. Maybe that was the point?
            thats def way too much work for 2 people in retirement. 3k should give you all you need, space for gym/music/guests that dont require constant upkeep.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Zaphod View Post

              thats def way too much work for 2 people in retirement. 3k should give you all you need, space for gym/music/guests that dont require constant upkeep.
              Maybe their goal was to not see each other for long stretches although they're both home?

              Comment


              • Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post

                Maybe their goal was to not see each other for long stretches although they're both home?
                Duplex!
                “Work” is a four letter word for good reason.

                Comment


                • Read the square footage wrong on the 6000; thought originally it was 600 square feet. Six hundred square feet would be about right and cozy for San Francisco for a cool million.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by F0017S0 View Post

                    Gordon Ramsey said that he flies business/first with his wife and has his kids fly coach. Wants them to work their way up. So buy the business/first tickets and jam the kids in the rear with the gear.

                    I am surprised he did not check them in with his luggage and pick them up at the destination on the carousel. Would have been far less expensive than coach.

                    Sometimes these idiots go too far proselyting about working their way up and pulling yourselves by your bootstraps. If you can't afford to take your family with you together, just leave them at home. What will you do when you reach your destination. You stay in the guest house and they stay in the outhouse?. Sheesh. Gordon will find that when he is old and with a stroke and not able to walk, his children will not even bother to visit him, after the way he has treated them.

                    Sorry, had to get that off my chest.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Larry Ragman View Post

                      Our society does make it hard sometimes. Here is a recent example in my life. A former colleague of mine recently bought a million dollar, 6000SF house in a community my wife and I are interested in for retirement. Having passed on the opportunity, I can say with certainty that I have no interest in a house that large for retirement. It is just the two of them. Very nice houses at 3000SF go for $600K in that community. My read: Crazy waste of money. Other friends in the community read was: Wow, he must be doing really well. Maybe that was the point?
                      My take on it is - The difference between 600K and a the $1M is only $400K. Maybe he does not need the 400K. Maybe he wants to have guests and entertain people. Maybe he read the Bill Paxton book die penniless and is practicing it.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Kamban View Post

                        My take on it is - The difference between 600K and a the $1M is only $400K. Maybe he does not need the 400K. Maybe he wants to have guests and entertain people. Maybe he read the Bill Paxton book die penniless and is practicing it.
                        Yeah, who knows? I can say there is other conspicuous consumption involved, but I think beyond a certain point it is inappropriate to share. I was just making a point anyway, not trying to analyze the guy.

                        I remember Die Broke as written by Stephan Pollen. I enjoyed it back in the day, but it was a bit too clever for me. I don’t live that way.

                        Comment


                        • Must be nice to live in a place where you can buy a shack for under a million.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Shant View Post
                            Must be nice to live in a place where you can buy a shack for under a million.
                            Life is about choices. Why live somewhere you can’t buy a nice house for half that?

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Shant View Post
                              Must be nice to live in a place where you can buy a shack for under a million.
                              It is.

                              Comment


                              • The concept of a "millionaire" goes at least back to the Beverly Hillbillies, which first aired in 1962. Assuming "millionaire" means a million or more and assuming you can double your investment every 10 years, that amount is equal to $64 million today. That puts the concept of "millionaire" into perspective.

                                Having $1M in liquid assets with no debt/mortgage, your 401k maxed out, and living below your means on a steady income and health insurance would fit the average Joe's perception of "rich." Just having a net worth of $1M doesn't seem like much when most of that is in your 401k and house.

                                One of my cousins calls me his "rich cousin." Even though I passed a net worth of $1M a while ago, I would not consider myself rich because most of that is in my house and 401k.

                                Originally posted by wideopenspaces View Post
                                We just took a 5 week trip across the country and during that time flew somewhere else for a few days. I figure if I can take a vacation during my vacation, I'm probably rich.
                                Ha. My wife planned a trip to Yosemite for us. I told her twice to check on whether we need a pass to get in to the park. She said we didn't. Upon flying all the way out to San Francisco and driving to Yosemite we found out you need a pass and everything was sold out at least a week in advance. You see, if you are staying at lodging in the park, you automatically get a 3-day pass, and she confused our Yosemite "View" Lodge outside the park with Yosemite "Valley" Lodge inside the park (even though I told her I could not get lodging in the park). After previously being so excited about our first trip since Covid started, I could see the tears of disappointment welling up in her eyes, so I started scouring the web for a solution. Even though lodging had previously been sold out, a batch of rooms was magically released. The cheapest ones started disappearing, but I was able to book the last available room for $300 without batting an eye. The mid day temp was 106 degrees F, the room didn't have an air conditioner, and our current hotel was already paid for, so we just brought one extra day's worth of clothes and toiletries and left the rest at our hotel room.

                                Some people have a house and a vacation house. We had a hotel room and a vacation hotel room.

                                I take back what I said above. I would consider myself rich.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X