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  • #76
    Originally posted by STATscans View Post

    Trout ? Worms, flies or power bait?
    Well, I was about to try dynamite today. I tried power bait. Another guy next to me was using worms and there was a few fly fisherman (beautiful).. Nothing biting anything. It was a nice morning and after fishing for a few hours I ran 3 miles around the lake, so still a nice experience. Sometimes they just don't bite!

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    • #77
      Given the number of replies, STATscans' post must be resonating with a lot of forum members. It does with me. Generally speaking, I'm more comfortable in my skin now at 56, when compared to prior decades. I've reached all the professional and financial milestones that I've wanted to accomplish. Physically, I'm feeling pretty good, still riding my bike, and skiing fast. However, there's something else that's bothering me. I don't think it's my age. Could be the pandemic, or my youngest child leaving for college in the Fall. The thought of being an empty nester is making me feel older and lonelier than any physical ailments that I'm noticing.

      I find myself reaching out to reconnect with old friends more than ever. Anyone else doing the same?

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      • #78
        I'm in my early 60's and each year plan to hike between 10-15 peaks. I'm not the fastest anymore though I can still get by a lot of people in their 30's but I don't really care. I've done a few hundred peaks but no longer go for the highest, longest, most challenging routinely. For me, it's about the time outdoors and backcountry enjoying the beauty and solitude, challenging myself with stream crossings, tricky terrain, new places, negotiating weather at high altitude, meeting people on trails, and most importantly, enjoying the people with me if I'm not alone.

        Have had a knee issue but with PRP injection has solved it for several years. Deal with a torn plantar fascia but have modified my boots and various shoes to help significantly. Due to the knee and foot, have lost some strength and a bit of security on rocky terrain but I cannot change the clock and make the best of it.

        While doing my fellowship years ago, one of the attendings gave me a piece of paper with a clock on it with the words below. I have it taped on the inside of a door in my home office.

        ​​​​​​The clock of life is wound but once,
        And no man has the power
        To tell just when the hands will stop
        At late or early hour.

        The present only is our own,
        So live, love, toil with a will,
        Place no faith in "Tomorrow,"
        For the Clock may then be still.


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        • #79
          Originally posted by OldSoul View Post
          , or my youngest child leaving for college in the Fall. The thought of being an empty nester is making me feel older and lonelier than any physical ailments that I'm noticing.
          I am in the same boat.

          For many years I was single and had no problems with it. Then I was joined by a spouse and my life became easier. Then I had a daughter and after a few initial challenges it was a joy to see her grow up and become a part of me.

          Now she is heading off to college in 5 months and the thought itself brings on loneliness and sadness. Even though she is still in the house. When the actual even comes I am not sure how I will deal with it. This will be the first subtraction I will have to deal with.

          That will bring into sharp focus on how much I have aged.

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          • #80
            Any older parents here? We wont be empty nesters for another 15 years or so. That would put me around 60ish. Wonder if it would be a different feel.

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            • #81
              Originally posted by VagabondMD View Post
              I have been a runner since my third year of med school (1988). Over the years my interest in competitive running has waxed and waned but my final peak was at age 47, where I won or placed in my age group in three events (10k, half marathon, and trail 20k). My 10k time that year was 40:02 (a 6:27/mile pace). Since then, it has been all downhill. I snapped my popliteus tendon in the next year's 20k trail run and have literally been slowing ever since. Arthritis in my left knee and right 1st MTP has me down to running only 2 days per week (10 miles), but I have transitioned to three days on the Peloton and additional yoga and strength classes, at least once per week.

              At first, I was very despondent about my declining performance and refused to run races. I was reluctant to document my decline. After speaking to an older friend (10 years older) who was always an avid cyclist, he told me that in his early 50's, he removed the speedometers from his bikes for similar reasons. It makes sense. None of us lives forever, and while physical decline is part of the aging process, we can still work to preserve our health and our athletic abilities as best we can, acknowledging that we will never be able to perform as we did in our 20's and 30's.
              I’m curious with your years of experience if you’ve come across Phil Maffetone and his ideas on aerobic training, maximum aerobic fitness, and his 180 - age formula. Any thoughts on his approach?

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              • #82
                Originally posted by pierre View Post

                I’m curious with your years of experience if you’ve come across Phil Maffetone and his ideas on aerobic training, maximum aerobic fitness, and his 180 - age formula. Any thoughts on his approach?
                Big fan of Maffetone. I know HIIT is all the craze right now. Builds muscle and maximizes performance. I feel that HIIT optimizes lactate turnover and quick regeneration of glucose. But Maffetone is training your mitochondria into efficiently tapping the reservoirs of fat metabolism.

                From an evolutionary POV, HIIT bioenergetic processing enabled us to run away from a Sabertooth tiger. Aerobic fatty acid metabolism(cardio/maffetone) enabled us to follow herds of ruminants ad infinitum till we picked off a straggler.

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                • #83
                  Originally posted by burritos View Post

                  Big fan of Maffetone. I know HIIT is all the craze right now. Builds muscle and maximizes performance. I feel that HIIT optimizes lactate turnover and quick regeneration of glucose. But Maffetone is training your mitochondria into efficiently tapping the reservoirs of fat metabolism.

                  From an evolutionary POV, HIIT bioenergetic processing enabled us to run away from a Sabertooth tiger. Aerobic fatty acid metabolism(cardio/maffetone)
                  enabled us to follow herds of ruminants ad infinitum till we picked off a straggler.
                  how is this any different than the age old, “long slow run” that marathon runners do weekly?

                  His formula is weird. Take any medicine (any?) subtract 10. if you get 2 colds a year subtract 5. but add 5 if you’ve been competing for 2 or more years. Unless you take medicine; then don’t add 5.

                  180-age =133. Without any adjustments that number is ballpark my long slow run anyway - which I don’t do much of unless you call a 4.5 jog a ‘long’ slow run. I did similar albeit slightly faster 20 years ago when marathon training. Every marathon runner does a LSR and instinctively finds that same heart rate range they can support while maintaining light conversation. Maybe the big take home is you can start a little fast as long as you slow down through your run, to maintain a constant HR ?

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                  • #84
                    Originally posted by FIREshrink View Post

                    how is this any different than the age old, “long slow run” that marathon runners do weekly?

                    His formula is weird. Take any medicine (any?) subtract 10. if you get 2 colds a year subtract 5. but add 5 if you’ve been competing for 2 or more years. Unless you take medicine; then don’t add 5.

                    180-age =133. Without any adjustments that number is ballpark my long slow run anyway - which I don’t do much of unless you call a 4.5 jog a ‘long’ slow run. I did similar albeit slightly faster 20 years ago when marathon training. Every marathon runner does a LSR and instinctively finds that same heart rate range they can support while maintaining light conversation. Maybe the big take home is you can start a little fast as long as you slow down through your run, to maintain a constant HR ?
                    I don’t think there is any hard science behind the formula, just his decades of experience.

                    He really pushes a HR monitor on your runs because even doing the long slow run, your heart rate can creep up and then you’re not getting aerobic training anymore, and too much training in this heart rate zone can be detrimental to long term health. Personally I have found that even though I can breathe through my nose or hold a conversation, I have to go a lot slower than I normally would run to keep my HR in the optimal zone.

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by OldSoul View Post
                      I find myself reaching out to reconnect with old friends more than ever. Anyone else doing the same?
                      “Any older parents here? We wont be empty nesters for another 15 years or so. That would put me around 60ish. Wonder if it would be a different feel."

                      Yes.

                      •Work/life and kids completely dominate your life.
                      •Natural phases in life. A sense of mortality becomes reality. I have reached out to some from childhood, high school, college and grad school and prior work and acquaintances from kids activities.
                      •The person you knew is not the same person you remember. But for most, the conversation bridges into a new and different connection.
                      Trading connections, meetups and reunions that never in your wildest dreams would you have imagined.
                      •It’s just like making new acquaintances, some work and some don’t. The advantage is catching up has an element of trust and connection.
                      •The biggest disappointment was finding a college roommate was limited serving a second 10 year sentence for bank robbery. Of course he had been the PR person for a member of Congress. I don’t think my wife would have appreciated a reconnection when he gets out.
                      •One wife called me back and profusely thanked me. My buddy has early stages of dementia. Monthly phone calls would be appreciated.
                      •You hear all kinds of deep personal stories that wouldn’t be shared with strangers, because you aren’t a stranger, you are an old friend.
                      •Relationships become more important, reaching out can be an act of kindness. I would suggest, reaching out to the past as well as the present. Expect zero and any payback is a bonus. It is a different networking for an empty nester.

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                      • #86
                        burritos, your point about the extra pound is important. A lot of athletes get concerned when they exercise and either don’t lose weight, or gain weight. Like you said, it’s probably muscle gain. I tell fellow athletes it’s ok to watch the scale but pay more attention to how your clothes fit (or start measuring your waist, legs, arms, etc....) and that’ll show you the true extent or fat loss vs muscle gained

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                        • #87
                          Hawkeye225, I love that. Your attending was wise

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                          • #88
                            Originally posted by Eye3md View Post
                            I know a few docs still practicing in their 70s. A few have simply lived beyond their means and will work til they die. The others just don't seem to have any other life outside of medicine. This one spine surgeon is around 70. He operates from early in the AM until 8-9:00 at night. The guy has to have made multiple millions. He doesn't look worn down either. He looks like you just invited him to the most wonderful party every time I see him. Its his life and he seems to truly love it. I'm sure his family enjoys the money (they live in a $6M home in a LCOL area) but I bet they would like to see him more.
                            I cannot imagine a $6MM home in a LCOL area! Does it have an airport and petting zoo? Or do you mean it w/b $6MM in a MCOL or HCOL area?
                            Our passion is protecting clients and others from predatory and ignorant advisors. Fox & Co CPAs, Fox & Co Wealth Mgmt. 270-247-6087

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                            • #89
                              Originally posted by jfoxcpacfp View Post

                              I cannot imagine a $6MM home in a LCOL area! Does it have an airport and petting zoo? Or do you mean it w/b $6MM in a MCOL or HCOL area?
                              it looks like a monster sized home with columns and fancy decor. 12,000+ sq ft. Inside is filled with marble and all these decorative stuff from Europe (per the RE listing). Also, sits on a mountain top with views of the lake. Huge garage for the guy’s expensive cars.

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                              • #90
                                Originally posted by Eye3md View Post

                                it looks like a monster sized home with columns and fancy decor. 12,000+ sq ft. Inside is filled with marble and all these decorative stuff from Europe (per the RE listing). Also, sits on a mountain top with views of the lake. Huge garage for the guy’s expensive cars.
                                Should be pretty easy to sell when the time comes.

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