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  • #31
    Originally posted by FIREshrink View Post

    Why do you have to point out that fact? :-( yes more like 2/3 of my useful life is gone.
    I wouldn't say useful. You were probably no use to anyone as a self absorbed future doctor well into your thirties.

    So your useful life didn't start until your forties. And your useful life extends beyond your physically healthy and active life, given generativity and the importance of our elders in cultural transmission. From that perspective, you've only been useful for eight years, and you could be useful til 90, so you have 42/50 or 84% of your useful life left. 😁

    It's just that many of those useful years won't be healthy and active. ☹️[/QUOTE]

    You have a good memory of what people said :-P

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    • #32
      I used to be very active in triathlon. During most triathlons they write your age in sharpie on the back of your calf, so you know how old everyone is when they pass you or you pass them. Nothing like feeling like you’re having a great day, passing someone 10 years younger than you on the bike, only to be lapped a few minutes later by someone 15 years older than you.

      The favorite part of my practice is the 80+ population. I have a few 90 year olds who are still pretty active. More active than a lot of my 50 year olds. I’m sure some of it is genetic, some is lifestyle. A huge part is attitude. Then again, attitude itself is probably a mix of nature + nurture.

      A large part of my practice is differentiating normal effects of aging from actual pathology that needs intervention. It’s funny how many people come to the doctor because their back aches in the morning when they first get up, but after they stretch it’s better, or their knees ache after sitting for 3 hours, but once they get up and move around they’re fine, and expect some magical treatment to take it all away. I will say that one advantage of getting older as a doctor is people listen a little better when I tell them their complaint is just part of the aging process and they need to just tweak their exercise regimen a bit (or start exercising!).

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      • #33
        Originally posted by artemis View Post
        I agree with Hatton. It also helps to remember that our culture puts a premium on good looks and physical prowess, which is foolish precisely because those things inevitably fade. Improving your overall character, on the other hand, gives lasting rewards but is often overlooked. Focus more on the latter, and less on the former, and you'll be happier.
        Good advice! Also, focus on figuring out how to catch a trout. I am going tomorrow and I hope those critters don't outsmart me!

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Tangler View Post
          Good advice! Also, focus on figuring out how to catch a trout. I am going tomorrow and I hope those critters don't outsmart me!
          Always a worthy endeavor! Good luck! Those trout are wily creatures.

          Spending time out in nature is a great thing to do no matter what age a person is. And the nice thing about enjoying nature is that it isn't a competition. The person going on a leisurely stroll at the local botanical garden can be having just as nice a time as the person climbing a 14er. We should all probably be spending more time outdoors taking in fresh air and sunshine.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Tangler View Post
            Good advice! Also, focus on figuring out how to catch a trout. I am going tomorrow and I hope those critters don't outsmart me!
            Trout ? Worms, flies or power bait?

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Kamban View Post

              When you get over the hump of 60 years, you might remember fondly the time you were 48 years old.
              24 was sweet.
              Describe what is meant by the term half-life and what factors affect half-life.
              Half life keeps getting longer. At 96, the age of 48 will paradise.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by ENT Doc View Post
                I went to post a picture of that seemingly photoshopped muscle bound old man we are used to seeing in airline magazine ads. Turns out he’s a doctor and those aren’t photoshopped. Dr. Jeffry Life:

                https://www.lifeextension.com/magazi...ife-at-any-age

                https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.lat...ml%3f_amp=true

                “I’ll have what (he’s) having.”
                what he’s having is called vitamin S

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                • #38
                  Turning 40 didn’t bother me at all. My wife didn’t like turning 40, but for me it was just another day. I’m not sure why, but I HATED turning 50. I was down all day. After a couple of days in was fine, and 51 didn’t bother me at all. Maybe 50 just seems old to me? Who knows, I feel good, healthy, exercise a lot. Like Satchel Paige said, how old would you be if you didn’t know how old you were?

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Tim View Post

                    24 was sweet.
                    Describe what is meant by the term half-life and what factors affect half-life.
                    Half life keeps getting longer. At 96, the age of 48 will paradise.
                    Jack Lalanne was halfway at the age of 48.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by ENT Doc View Post
                      I went to post a picture of that seemingly photoshopped muscle bound old man we are used to seeing in airline magazine ads. Turns out he’s a doctor and those aren’t photoshopped. Dr. Jeffry Life:

                      https://www.lifeextension.com/magazi...ife-at-any-age

                      https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.lat...ml%3f_amp=true

                      “I’ll have what (he’s) having.”
                      The author of the second article, Roy Wallock, was an avid exercise enthusiast. Sadly he died mountain biking on a nearby trail:
                      https://www.latimes.com/california/s...iking-accident

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                      • #41
                        I'm not quite 40 and I'd say that so far life just keeps getting better so I have no idea how I'll deal with going back down the hill. But I hope to take the approach my grandmother did. She passed away, on her own terms, in the fall at the age of 88 and 11.5 months! While she was ready to go, she was very engaged in life. She quilted and gardened and played games and went to lunch with friends and family. She helped those in need. Physically she had aches and pains and last summer I planted the tomatoes for her. But she didn't focus too much on those things and I know she was happy. My neighbor across the street is about the same age and she and her 4 girlfriends walk around the neighborhood for about an hour every single day, come snow or heat or rain or covid. They're having a blast! And they make aging look pretty good. So I think part of it is building and maintaining your relationships and social support system, along with working on your physical health, that is important too.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by STATscans View Post

                          ​​​​​You say your life is almost just over half over. But realistically your active healthy self has maybe 25 years. More like 2/3 of that life is gone. Can't wait. Do it now!!
                          Why do you have to point out that fact? :-( yes more like 2/3 of my useful life is gone.[/QUOTE]

                          I strongly believe that we all have a useful life no matter what number is attached. The problem is that the lower the number, the less obvious is the purpose. I’m 64 and the majority of my success has been accomplished in the last 5 years. But the prior years prepared me for it.
                          Our passion is protecting clients and others from predatory and ignorant advisors. Fox & Co CPAs, Fox & Co Wealth Mgmt. 270-247-6087

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                          • #43
                            I'm 56, felt and looked youthful until mid 40s when things started changing mostly in my looks. Early 50s added noted reduction in stamina which was hard to swallow. Working a 16h shift started hurting regardless of the amount of coffee consumed and my running time, which was never very impressive, slowed considerably. In keeping with family members my face looks older than it is but I am still in decent physical shape...for someone my age. Was it a character of Maya Rudolph's who said as you age you have two choices- a youthful face and big a$$ or svelte figure and face like Skeletor?

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by StateOfMyHead View Post
                              I'm 56, felt and looked youthful until mid 40s when things started changing mostly in my looks. Early 50s added noted reduction in stamina which was hard to swallow. Working a 16h shift started hurting regardless of the amount of coffee consumed and my running time, which was never very impressive, slowed considerably. In keeping with family members my face looks older than it is but I am still in decent physical shape...for someone my age. Was it a character of Maya Rudolph's who said as you age you have two choices- a youthful face and big a$$ or svelte figure and face like Skeletor?
                              I think I’m between the 2 choices, certainty not a big A$$ but I’ve never thought I’ve had a svelte figure. Can you offer another option???
                              Last edited by jfoxcpacfp; 03-16-2021, 06:16 PM.
                              Our passion is protecting clients and others from predatory and ignorant advisors. Fox & Co CPAs, Fox & Co Wealth Mgmt. 270-247-6087

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                              • #45
                                Turn 60 in May and actually feeling pretty good. Retiring helps as I have yet to feel as achy or tired as I used to at the end of 24 or 32 hours of on-call and clinic at age 50 (or probably any age for that matter). My NSAID use is almost zero these days and that even includes post-hockey which is pretty good. Biggest difference I would say is ability to put in a full day of physical activity but some of that is definitely mental - as in 'I don't actually have to do this'. I am impressed by one of my neighbours at the cottage who is 53 and still goes all day like the Energizer Bunny despite being an overweight smoker. I bought a portable defibrillator for the cottage on Black Friday with him in mind!

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