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  • Your next move is...

    You find out that due to your unwillingness to continue to be more abused, the hospital owned group is replacing you.  You have spoken to the replacement.  The replacement is a young and willing new grad who admin has the upper hand to take advantage of with compensation.  What is your next move?

    You are 100% sure the group will make it work so that the new grad will be hired and things will be pushed through and you will be let go.  What is your next move? Do you tell the new grad that there is information out there (without needing to conflict with your own contractual obligations) to minimize that person from being taken advantageous of.  Is that unethical? Or should you simply mind your own business and prepare to walk away?

    What would be your next career move for yourself?

     

     

  • #2
    I had a new grad buddy who was about to take a job then got a call from one of the guys the hospital was running out who gave him the low down.. it scared my buddy off from taking the gig so it does sometimes work..

    Desperate times call for desperate measures. It might not be worth it to u but far from unethical

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    • #3
      Mind your own business and walk away.

      It sounds like you are unhappy in the current situation, anyway, and perhaps the new guy/gal will be a better fit. As for his/her compensation, that is for the other parties to work out, especially with you out of the picture. If it is truly a bad job, the new hire will also be gone soon, too.

      You need to find a situation that is better for you, move on, and don't look back. Best of luck.

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      • #4




        You find out that due to your unwillingness to continue to be more abused, the hospital owned group is replacing you.  You have spoken to the replacement.  The replacement is a young and willing new grad who admin has the upper hand to take advantage of with compensation.  What is your next move?

        You are 100% sure the group will make it work so that the new grad will be hired and things will be pushed through and you will be let go.  What is your next move? Do you tell the new grad that there is information out there (without needing to conflict with your own contractual obligations) to minimize that person from being taken advantageous of.  Is that unethical? Or should you simply mind your own business and prepare to walk away?

        What would be your next career move for yourself?

         

         
        Click to expand...


        I find that's a tricky area to negotiate. If the new hire is willing to listen, I would be happy to share my work experience and would not find it unethical.

        If the new hire doesn't want to know, I would be inclined to let him/her learn the hard way.

        The next career move probably differs from person to person. In my shoes, I would be looking for a chance to open a solo practice vs return to my training program to teach vs be very very particular about joining a "perfect fit" group practice again. While I could retire, I enjoy the practice of medicine enough where I don't think I could do it at my age and it would require a significant change in lifestyle that I am also not ready to embrace.

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        • #5
          I wouldn't offer, but wouldn't lie if asked the right question(s).  Otherwise, I'd mind my own business and walk away, but I'm in a financial/social/mental/physical spot that allows that!

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          • #6
            Time to move on.

            You sound hurt.

            There is no need to burn bridges.

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            • #7




              Time to move on.

              You sound hurt.

              There is no need to burn bridges.
              Click to expand...


              I appreciate the sentiment, but am not actually feeling hurt.  I saw it coming. Saw it as inevitable.  At some point, I looked at what I was willing to give vs what I was getting and did not feel that it was anymore on a mutually beneficial platform.

              I think the biggest dilemma here is, as physicians, how much accountability do we have to ourselves, to those following us to improve the future.

              I am sure all of you who have given the time to post your comments understand or can foresee what may (will) happen.  It becomes a vicious cycle, there is no empowerment for the physicians, for me or for those that will follow.

              I appreciate all those who have given advice toward my own professional development.

              I may not have lost the battle, but we (as the medical professionals) are no closer to winning the war.

              Regards.

               

               

               

               

              Comment


              • #8


                If the new hire is willing to listen, I would be happy to share my work experience and would not find it unethical. If the new hire doesn’t want to know, I would be inclined to let him/her learn the hard way.
                Click to expand...


                I think part of the problem is you haven't identified clearly what you're moving on to.  Try to let go of the emotions--*every* job in the world has Pros and Cons and not every person is the right fit for the job.  I work for the VA, and if someone were to ask me "what do you think are the Pros and Cons of working for the VA" I would just tell them what I think, regardless of whether I was leaving or not.  If I were leaving I might caveat and say "I had XYZ problem, but that doesn't mean you will have the same problem."  On the other hand I would not go out of my way to try to influence a new hire just because I had an axe to grind.  That may be unethical and if you influence the person too much you are now somewhat responsible for what happens to them.  But if you feel compelled you might just say "I'm available to answer any questions you may have" and leave it at that.  Going beyond that may lead to burned-bridges which is something you don't want.  Medicine is a small community and reputations matter a lot.  Even if the job was terrible it's in your interest to walk out the door with a smile and say "Thanks everyone, this was a great experience, and now I'm moving on to a new opportunity I'm really excited about."  That's what you say.  Everyone knows it may not be true but that's what you say.  After all, "great experience" is subject to your own definition which may mean "I learned never to fall into this trap again" and that's what you got out of it.  Fine.  Point being, I would not focus on the past problems, chalk it up to experience, offer your advice to the new hire only if they're interested, and focus all your time and energy on the next opportunity.  Easier said than done but if you need a career "reset" I like the idea of going to a Residency teaching or Fellowship program which is a great way to steer in a new direction without running away from something.

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                • #9
                  It won't ultimately help you to say anything.  It might help the new hire, but if he/she backs out, they'll just find another one.  You unfortunately can't change the program yourself, so you might as well just go your merry way.  Certainly offer advice to anyone that asks you about the position though.

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                  • #10





                    If the new hire is willing to listen, I would be happy to share my work experience and would not find it unethical. If the new hire doesn’t want to know, I would be inclined to let him/her learn the hard way. 
                    Click to expand…


                    I think part of the problem is you haven’t identified clearly what you’re moving on to.  Try to let go of the emotions–*every* job in the world has Pros and Cons and not every person is the right fit for the job.  I work for the VA, and if someone were to ask me “what do you think are the Pros and Cons of working for the VA” I would just tell them what I think, regardless of whether I was leaving or not.  If I were leaving I might caveat and say “I had XYZ problem, but that doesn’t mean you will have the same problem.”  On the other hand I would not go out of my way to try to influence a new hire just because I had an axe to grind.  That may be unethical and if you influence the person too much you are now somewhat responsible for what happens to them.  But if you feel compelled you might just say “I’m available to answer any questions you may have” and leave it at that.  Going beyond that may lead to burned-bridges which is something you don’t want.  Medicine is a small community and reputations matter a lot.  Even if the job was terrible it’s in your interest to walk out the door with a smile and say “Thanks everyone, this was a great experience, and now I’m moving on to a new opportunity I’m really excited about.”  That’s what you say.  Everyone knows it may not be true but that’s what you say.  After all, “great experience” is subject to your own definition which may mean “I learned never to fall into this trap again” and that’s what you got out of it.  Fine.  Point being, I would not focus on the past problems, chalk it up to experience, offer your advice to the new hire only if they’re interested, and focus all your time and energy on the next opportunity.  Easier said than done but if you need a career “reset” I like the idea of going to a Residency teaching or Fellowship program which is a great way to steer in a new direction without running away from something.
                    Click to expand...


                    Very well said, I will have to keep that in mind if I ever leave my job

                    I was responding more as a hypothetical as I've never had to make that choice personally.

                    On the flip side, I have been on the other end. I was a new hire taking over a position from a bitter, disgruntled employee (there was some debate as to whether he was pushed out or whether he left on his own accord). I made the mistake of asking the employee what he thought of the group. There was obvious bias in his recollection and the whole conversation was awkward and uncomfortable. In the end, I would have been better off not asking and just figuring things out on my own (which ended up being just fine seeing as I'm still at my current position and happy). Silly on my part, what else would I have expected a disgruntled outgoing employee to say?

                    I agree that your method is the classier and healthier way to approach an exit!

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