Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

It's Not Just Hospitals That Are Quick To Sue Patients Who Can't Pay

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by ITEngineer View Post
    We just got a $1.06 bill from our child's PCP for a vaccine that wasn't fully covered.
    We want to pay in pennies.
    The bill arrived 8 months after the visit. I can only imagine the fight between the PCP and insurer.
    When you think of the price of a stamp they aren't getting much 'profit' from sending this bill.
    You can protest it to the insurance company! That will cost them more than $1.06. Sometimes rules don’t make “cents”. I’d only a buck to see what happens.

    Comment


    • #17
      My spouse just got a bill from a collections agency for an urgent care visit 18 months ago. He thought he had paid when he was there with our kid, and they never billed us. It turns out they had entered our address wrong, so we never got a bill, but somehow the collections agency was able to find us no problem. I used to work for a private equity owned group that had the same problem--they cheaped out on billing services, and ended up sending so many people to collections unnecessarily. They sent one of our surgeons to collections--so embarrassing. They save a penny on sloppy, understaffed, underpaid billing services, and then don't understand why so many patients "don't pay." SMH

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Lordosis View Post

        maybe more people would come to see me in the office if I was willing to give them a shot of Dilaudid when they came in with acute pain.

        All joking aside some people have a really hard time getting into their primary doctor's office. I'm not sure why people make it so difficult. I try to be incredibly accommodating and get anybody in almost anytime. but even still people don't even call us and go straight to the emergency room and there's nothing we can do about that.
        From all of your posts, you seem like a really good doc. Your patients are lucky to have you.

        Comment


        • #19
          I think the title of this post (and of NPR’s article) is inappropriately conclusory. Patients who don’t pay are being sued. Some subset of the patients being sued may be patients who can’t pay.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by ITEngineer View Post
            We just got a $1.06 bill from our child's PCP for a vaccine that wasn't fully covered.
            We want to pay in pennies.
            The bill arrived 8 months after the visit. I can only imagine the fight between the PCP and insurer.
            When you think of the price of a stamp they aren't getting much 'profit' from sending this bill.
            I have had many a physical check from Aetna, Medicaid and Humana for $0.01. I once tore one of Humana penny checks in disgust and our office received 2 calls on why that check did not clear and if I had deposited it at all. It must have messed up their system.
            Last edited by Kamban; 02-21-2020, 07:48 AM.

            Comment


            • #21
              ^^^ Same here, penny checks. Its not worth the ink from my pen, the bak deposit slip, & having to add it to the other checks to deposit. I thought about framing some on the wall, but I'm sure at some point I signed an insurance contract saying I wouldn't do that. I keep them all in a paperclip.

              I am so very much hoping now I get a call about why a 1 cent wasn't cashed. I would love to have that conversation with them... Kamban has given me a new life goal.
              $1 saved = >$1 earned. ✓

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Tim View Post

                You can protest it to the insurance company! That will cost them more than $1.06. Sometimes rules don’t make “cents”. I’d only a buck to see what happens.
                I believe the correct response to this is *groan*

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post

                  From all of your posts, you seem like a really good doc. Your patients are lucky to have you.
                  Thanks. I hope that if I unfortunately end up in an ER the doc has half your sense of humor.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Lordosis View Post

                    I believe the correct response to this is *groan*
                    Sue me!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by nephron View Post
                      There should be a rule against billing uninsured patients more then a physician would accept in medicare/medicaid reimbursement. If a physician is willing to accept x amount doing work for medicare/medicaid, why should he/she expect an uninsured patient to pay some multiple of that. That being said, I feel like it probably would be good if they held patients more financially liable for ER visits. It does help dissuade unnecessary visits. Maybe make some sort of option where people can have their copay waived if the patient reasonably thought that they were dealing with an emergency (ie certain symptoms) or if they are admitted.
                      Huh? You obviously are an employee and not a business owner.
                      This is all about negotiations. If you have X insurance, you get the fee negotiated with X insurance. These fees are severely discounted. So why accept those fees? Volume. They keep sending you patients. I tell uninsured patients they can get the same rates as insurance patients if they can give me what insurance gives me....10 new paying patients every week.

                      And you quote Medicare/Medicaid??? Those are rock bottom fees which allow staff to get paid but not the doctor.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Hank View Post
                        I think the title of this post (and of NPR’s article) is inappropriately conclusory. Patients who don’t pay are being sued. Some subset of the patients being sued may be patients who can’t pay.
                        agree 100%

                        it will be interesting to see how hospitals navigate this as it is obviously a PR nightmare

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by ENT Doc View Post
                          I suggest reading Dr. Makary’s The Price We Pay. The beginning of the book goes over research they did in this matter of suing patients. It wasn’t a private equity issue. Non-profits were some of the worst offenders.
                          good point. I'll have to check out that book. I know physician practices that sue patients/take them to court for unpaid bills, and I don't fault them for that...they are running a business and trying to stay open. the optics just make it seem more nefarious when it's done by private equity

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by MFM DOC View Post

                            good point. I'll have to check out that book. I know physician practices that sue patients/take them to court for unpaid bills, and I don't fault them for that...they are running a business and trying to stay open. the optics just make it seem more nefarious when it's done by private equity
                            https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jam...rticle/2737183

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Lordosis View Post

                              maybe more people would come to see me in the office if I was willing to give them a shot of Dilaudid when they came in with acute pain.

                              All joking aside some people have a really hard time getting into their primary doctor's office. I'm not sure why people make it so difficult. I try to be incredibly accommodating and get anybody in almost anytime. but even still people don't even call us and go straight to the emergency room and there's nothing we can do about that.
                              How accommodating are you on Saturday afternoon at 4 pm? How about Sunday morning at 4 am? Exactly. Being accommodating 1/4 of the week isn't going to move the needle much. Emergentologist or availabologist?
                              Helping those who wear the white coat get a fair shake on Wall Street since 2011

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by The White Coat Investor View Post

                                How accommodating are you on Saturday afternoon at 4 pm? How about Sunday morning at 4 am? Exactly. Being accommodating 1/4 of the week isn't going to move the needle much. Emergentologist or availabologist?
                                Without a doubt a lot of stuff happens on nights and weekends but a lot of that stuff can wait to be seen non emergently. When I am on call I am either convincine people that they should go to the ER vs convincing them not to.

                                But what I am talking about is the person has a sore throat and goes to the ER 8 am on a Tuesday. Because they call their primary and are told they can be seen next friday. Maybe it would not move the needle much but I am sure my ED counterparts have better things to do then deal with that.
                                Also from a patient standpoint it is a much better experience to come in for an outpatient appointment then to go to the ED.
                                Also from a financial standpoint I am a much cheaper date then you.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X