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MD interested in mobile IV hydration side hustle

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  • #61




    Antibiotics and opiates to stop whining is also inappropriate. I never said it’s evil. Just its inappropriate.
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    The peoples are thirsty, so thirsty they wants it in their veins. They know they can also drink it, but its slower, and frankly they feel cool. Its an experience you're selling.

    Interested in boards thoughts on whats deemed "cosmetic", because of course thats subjective and while many things are actually cosmetic, ie, dont change the medical/functional outcomes, only some things are called cosmetic and or denied by insurance for that reason.

    Sunscreen is good because it reduces skin cancer, botox bad because it only reduces wrinkles?

    Breast cancer reconstruction good because it was cancer that started it, breast implants bad because unnecessary? No difference really, yes restores normal, but breasts arent exactly needed physiologically. Psychologically, can be a big deal, but thats true about a great many things currently classified as "cosmetic" and looked down upon by insurance, doctors and the public alike.

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    • #62




      Antibiotics and opiates to stop whining is also inappropriate. I never said it’s evil. Just its inappropriate.
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      You tend to say everything is inappropriate, unethical. Midlevels seeing patients without supervision. Hospitalists that don't spend their entire shift in the hospital. In office or physician owned ancillaries. Therapies given with weak indication. Physicians covering more than one facility or operating at more than one facility.

      I think your perspective will change with age and broader experience.

      **  Edited to add "without supervision"  **

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      • #63
        Well that escalated quickly.

        Sorry to disappoint those whose superior moral codes would NEVER allow them to even consider such a "business", but I--the dishonest and unethical charlatan unbecoming of my medical degree and a disappointment to the profession--have much more moral distress over the support I provide to various chemotherapy and CT surgery treatments.  I will sleep like a baby after giving a consenting, cash-paying adult a liter of fluid if he/she feels like it helps their hangover or athletic performance.  Much better, in fact, then the nights where I'm repeatedly coding patients in the ICU who should have died months ago.  Don't judge me for not wanting to do this forever.

        I did say I was all ears and I'm glad people have taken interest in the topic.  Even all the financially-savvy Negative Dr. Nancys who continue to beat their dead (high) horses should find solace knowing I got as much value from their opinions as I paid for them.  I appreciate those who have provided legitimate feedback about the hazards of lifestyle creep and owning a small business.  Though this was my first thread in here I have been following for a long while and already do many of the good things touted here--maxing tax benefitted accounts, saving half our combined income, etc.  The funds I would use to pursue any side hustle are extra at this point.  The points about mindful spending being the foundation for future financial success are absolutely valid.

        My original question remains.  I'm looking for a side hustle and this has been presented to me.  I'm still curious to hear from those who looked into it and decided against it (@zaphod).  What made you decide not to do it?  I agree it's riding a fad right now to some extent, but as was pointed out early in this thread the sustainable trend is towards personalized medicine in the comfort of one's home (though I agree that putting in a Cordis and getting out of there in 10 minutes or less is more up my alley).

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        • #64
          I never said anything about cosmesis zaphod. Different can of worms and I'm not one to evaluate the psychological ramifications associated with.

          Yes jacoavlu I think there's a lot of bs in medical world we should cut out. Real easy, would I want this care to be rendered on my loved one. Unfortunately I see a lot of stuff that I wouldn't. And you summarized things in an incorrect way. For example, I have a problem with indepedent midlevels, not midlevels with appropriate supervision ( which is actual supervision).

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          • #65




            You’re also blatantly encouraging alcoholism as that is vast majority of people who are going to be utilizing this. Let’s not be delusional and say the typical client is going to be a marathoner or die hard crossfitter.
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            that is just absurd.

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            • #66
              I just made way more money building up what I was already doing. Plus counting the time and travel (if mobile or going to events as I was thinking a significant performance athlete angle) it started to sound like more work.

              Didnt mean to imply you did @panscan, was an honest question to the board.

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              • #67


                And you summarized things in an incorrect way. For example, I have a problem with indepedent midlevels, not midlevels with appropriate supervision ( which is actual supervision).
                Click to expand...


                ok I edited my post. My criticism of your general attitude stands.

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                • #68
                  And we are complaining the financial advisors and insurance sales people won't agree to a fiduciary responsibility?  Of course, the line was crossed long ago for medicine so what the heck. Agree with sentiments voiced, primum non nocere.

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                  • #69
                    Anyone who says drinking is the same clearly has never received such treatment for a GI illness, altitude sickness, post-marathon treatment, or hangover treatment. The difference is night and day real. I think the location of such services will make or break the business. It is also not going to be easy money as you need to be available at odd hours and during holidays and weekends. And what do you know about putting IVs? 80% are easy, 10% are hard, and 10% you need to be a real expert. I'd venture out and say some of these populations looking for services are going to be dehydrated and their veins are not going to be easy. I think with a well thought-out business plan this has a chance to generate some income.

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                    • #70




                      Well that escalated quickly.

                      Sorry to disappoint those whose superior moral codes would NEVER allow them to even consider such a “business”, but I–the dishonest and unethical charlatan unbecoming of my medical degree and a disappointment to the profession–have much more moral distress over the support I provide to various chemotherapy and CT surgery treatments.  I will sleep like a baby after giving a consenting, cash-paying adult a liter of fluid if he/she feels like it helps their hangover or athletic performance.  Much better, in fact, then the nights where I’m repeatedly coding patients in the ICU who should have died months ago.  Don’t judge me for not wanting to do this forever.

                      I did say I was all ears and I’m glad people have taken interest in the topic.  Even all the financially-savvy Negative Dr. Nancys who continue to beat their dead (high) horses should find solace knowing I got as much value from their opinions as I paid for them.  I appreciate those who have provided legitimate feedback about the hazards of lifestyle creep and owning a small business.  Though this was my first thread in here I have been following for a long while and already do many of the good things touted here–maxing tax benefitted accounts, saving half our combined income, etc.  The funds I would use to pursue any side hustle are extra at this point.  The points about mindful spending being the foundation for future financial success are absolutely valid.

                      My original question remains.  I’m looking for a side hustle and this has been presented to me.  I’m still curious to hear from those who looked into it and decided against it (@zaphod).  What made you decide not to do it?  I agree it’s riding a fad right now to some extent, but as was pointed out early in this thread the sustainable trend is towards personalized medicine in the comfort of one’s home (though I agree that putting in a Cordis and getting out of there in 10 minutes or less is more up my alley).
                      Click to expand...


                      If you aren’t feeling the love for critical care (and it sounds like you’re not), why not find a different field of medicine or do hospital medicine.

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                      • #71
                        I see both sides of the argument here. The whole “topping people off” with a red blood cell transfusion already goes on plenty.

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                        • #72
                          I don't care if you give IV fluids with Zofran or Toradol or Vitamins to either people with hangover or for wellness.

                          I am just concentrating on the financial part of it. As a mobile service you should charge sufficiently and have sufficient volumes to make it worthwhile. Unless it is Las Vegas with its heat and drunkenness or LA with people who have money to spare, I don't see this being successful in the other parts of the country. But the choice to do it or not do it is yours.

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                          • #73


                            The whole “topping people off” with a red blood cell transfusion already goes on plenty.
                            Click to expand...


                            Many hospitals have strict criteria for PRBC to prevent this topping off transfusion. Unless some bigwig wants to flout the rules.

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                            • #74
                              As they should. I’ve just seen it happen because some VA big wig always got what he wanted.

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                              • #75







                                The whole “topping people off” with a red blood cell transfusion already goes on plenty.
                                Click to expand…


                                Many hospitals have strict criteria for PRBC to prevent this topping off transfusion. Unless some bigwig wants to flout the rules.
                                Click to expand...


                                They do, but in my experience you have to do a lot of work to get medicine docs to not give your asymptomatic post op pts blood. I was just blatantly shocked at how non large academic centers are run and the difference in care, not bad docs, but the style of practice tends to center on the median graduation date of the docs.

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