Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Nursing hedge, PAY$$$

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Nursing hedge, PAY$$$

    I'm sure many are going through this, but our hospital and OR currently has several traveling nurses.
    Ive seen ICU traveling nurses getting payed up to 200$/hr including lodging

    Whether it's COVID, vaccine mandate, progressing to get NP, or leaving to spend more time with family can be debated. The fact is nurses are leaving the profession. In our hospital current nurses are seeing what travelers are making and saying "screw this i'm not going to do the same job for way less pay"

    The job market will probably equalize itself out but I can see a new change where nurses take contract length jobs and jump from hospital to hospital. It's frustrating in the OR not having the same staff...

    So after some recon I came across CCRN a traveling nursing (plus other profession) staffing agency. Since I don't see this system getting any better with covid numbers at all time high i've taken a small position in CCRN. Helps me have patience for low staffing knowing I may be making some profit off the situation...

    How much of your hospital is travelers and how much are they making? Do you see it getting better?

  • #2
    I don't know how much the travelers are paid that it seems like maybe a third are travelers. I have the impression that a lot of nurses have switched to travelers for the pay differential (and who can blame them). I suspect that there are many situations where nurses in city A travel to hospital in city B while nurses in city B travel to hospital in city A. Hospitals need to find a way to incentivize full time nurses better. I would think that they would end up saving money if they could get away from being so dependent on travelers.

    Comment


    • #3
      There are local "travelers" now. I worked with a ED RN who quit her job in a hospital 20 minutes away to take locums shifts in this area. She technically isn't traveling and told me she is making double what she was paid as a staff RN.

      Comment


      • #4
        I really haven't seen a lot of nurses leave the profession in my experience. Some have become travelers and some have stayed in nursing but moved into different departments. The nursing issue will work itself out and those wanting the crazy traveler rates will find themselves without a position.

        Comment


        • #5
          We have two large hospital systems locally. Nurses early in career and late in career are quiting and signing up with agencies to go back to work at the same system with similar rates as listed above.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post
            I really haven't seen a lot of nurses leave the profession in my experience. Some have become travelers and some have stayed in nursing but moved into different departments. The nursing issue will work itself out and those wanting the crazy traveler rates will find themselves without a position.
            The leading cause of nurses leaving is insufficient staffing. To me it seems like a downward spiral as when one leaves it worsens the problem. Nurses then jump to traveler company and get payed what they feel the workload is. i'm hopeful it will resolve but I don't see thousands of nurses joining the workforce...

            just look at revenue record of these traveler companies like CCRN....

            Comment


            • #7
              https://www.usa.edu/blog/nursing-shortage/
              Periodically, the nursing shortage has raised it’ head.
              Traveling is a “temp agency” compared to using a recruiter vs a permanent hire.
              Nursing as a vocation comes with a lot of crap. Money talks and is available.
              The “new nurses” will be attracted and become “experienced” and settle in. Musical chairs. Long term, RN’s per 1000 population will be the supply vs demand constraint. That is shown in the attachment.

              Comment


              • #8
                I don’t want to turn this political but honestly the only short-term solution I see is that the govt needs to increase immigration massively (especially for skilled nurses) or the labor and healthcare shortage problem is going to get worse.

                Comment


                • #9
                  All of this makes me worry about the financial solvency of hospital systems and specifically my NG 457b. I suppose my defined benefit plan is federally insured at least. How can hospitals go on paying nurses as much as they pay doctors? Can they rely on federal bailouts? On top of that, my hospital is scheduled to be demolished and rebuilt due to earthquake risk, which will surely cost a pretty penny.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dusn View Post
                    I don’t want to turn this political but honestly the only short-term solution I see is that the govt needs to increase immigration massively (especially for skilled nurses) or the labor and healthcare shortage problem is going to get worse.
                    Not political by any means. Targeted immigration has always been a tool based upon merit that has been useful and mutually beneficial.
                    If memory serves me correctly, the Philippines was once a targeted source of nurses. Even the Manhattan Project used “immigrants”. Of course from a global perspective, that is viewed as a brain drain. Exploitation by the US. Never ending.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Otolith View Post

                      The leading cause of nurses leaving is insufficient staffing. To me it seems like a downward spiral as when one leaves it worsens the problem. Nurses then jump to traveler company and get payed what they feel the workload is. i'm hopeful it will resolve but I don't see thousands of nurses joining the workforce...

                      just look at revenue record of these traveler companies like CCRN....
                      It’ll be a year or two but new grads will fill many of those slots. Our ED has replaced lots of holes with new grads. We’re still overall down but it’s better than it was. The crazy pay rates won’t last forever for that degree. It doesn’t take forever (like medical school and residency) to get a nursing degree and paramedics can also fill in for many nursing tasks (at least in the ED). It may take a few years but these rates and issues would surprise me if they’re still around. Travel nursing has always been a thing but it’ll go back to being what it was before, I think. CCRN is probably a good example of making hay while the son shines.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post

                        It’ll be a year or two but new grads will fill many of those slots. Our ED has replaced lots of holes with new grads. We’re still overall down but it’s better than it was. The crazy pay rates won’t last forever for that degree. It doesn’t take forever (like medical school and residency) to get a nursing degree and paramedics can also fill in for many nursing tasks (at least in the ED). It may take a few years but these rates and issues would surprise me if they’re still around. Travel nursing has always been a thing but it’ll go back to being what it was before, I think. CCRN is probably a good example of making hay while the son shines.
                        Or maybe they'll just do away with nurses. I heard from a residency friend that they were putting the finishes touches on policy to allow docs to pass meds. And the other day I learned of a plan where some of our ER patients won't even see a nurse after triage....

                        Why staff nurses at all? Just make the private practice docs do the nursing for free.

                        And I have no doubt that the financially insecure, conflict averse house of medicine will allow it. All while the hospital bureaucracy expands and the CEO gets a fat bonus for meeting budget.

                        Orwell could not have crafted a better dystopian thriller.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Gamma Knives View Post
                          Hospitals need to find a way to incentivize full time nurses better. I would think that they would end up saving money if they could get away from being so dependent on travelers.
                          Every economics textbook says it is far cheaper to keep existing customers than try and get new ones. But every company that interacts with customers directly ignores this message.

                          Take my recent example with T-Mobile. I was with them for 4+ years. And my phones were getting long in the tooth. And they had a promotion of BOGO phones. And when I asked the local T-Mobile store about having that applied to my plan, they flatly refused. Said that corporate has kept it exclusively for new customers. I asked them whether are they stupid trying to spend a lot of money and advertisements trying to get customers to switch when they could very well keep satisfied customers like me for another 4+ years.,. They shrugged and said that they have very little incentives to keep us in the fold.. I was ready to jump ship when I realized that all I needed to do was to cancel and have the new phones and plan in my wife's name. Other than hassle of new numbers, it was the same.

                          The hospitals are playing the same game as the cable and phone companies. And the smart nurses have recognized this and play their own game and the hospitals are dancing to their tune.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by G View Post

                            Or maybe they'll just do away with nurses. I heard from a residency friend that they were putting the finishes touches on policy to allow docs to pass meds. And the other day I learned of a plan where some of our ER patients won't even see a nurse after triage....

                            Why staff nurses at all? Just make the private practice docs do the nursing for free.

                            And I have no doubt that the financially insecure, conflict averse house of medicine will allow it. All while the hospital bureaucracy expands and the CEO gets a fat bonus for meeting budget.

                            Orwell could not have crafted a better dystopian thriller.
                            There does seem to be a lot of things I do myself already...get urine, ambulate patients, etc...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Kamban View Post

                              Every economics textbook says it is far cheaper to keep existing customers than try and get new ones. But every company that interacts with customers directly ignores this message.

                              Take my recent example with T-Mobile. I was with them for 4+ years. And my phones were getting long in the tooth. And they had a promotion of BOGO phones. And when I asked the local T-Mobile store about having that applied to my plan, they flatly refused. Said that corporate has kept it exclusively for new customers. I asked them whether are they stupid trying to spend a lot of money and advertisements trying to get customers to switch when they could very well keep satisfied customers like me for another 4+ years.,. They shrugged and said that they have very little incentives to keep us in the fold.. I was ready to jump ship when I realized that all I needed to do was to cancel and have the new phones and plan in my wife's name. Other than hassle of new numbers, it was the same.

                              The hospitals are playing the same game as the cable and phone companies. And the smart nurses have recognized this and play their own game and the hospitals are dancing to their tune.
                              The kid at the store does not care at all. even if you called and spoke to someone at customer service they probably would not care. Someone with a brain that could see this as a problem would be unreachable to the regular user. However that person also realizes that not enough people will care enough to actually do something about it.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X