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Senior partners "stealing" patients

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  • #16
    Anecdotally, patients can be fickle. Getting “fired” is rarely smooth. One called and canceled “all future appointments” and switched to a department head. One week later, “Can you do the surgery on Friday?” They also come back.
    Do not assume that the other physician had anything to do with patient stealing. Usually the patient initiated a switch.

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    • #17
      This kind of thing will happen. You lost this one but will gain others down the road. Do not worry about it. Patients can be crazy.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Nysoz View Post
        Maybe it’s a robotic case and you can hack into the Davinci and take over the case that way.

        Or like cord said wait until they’re scrubbed in, but gently sneak up behind them and put your arms through the sleeves of the gown too… kinda like ghost
        What's the CPT code for hacked remote robotic surgery?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by DamageInc View Post

          What's the CPT code for hacked remote robotic surgery?
          12345

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Nysoz View Post

            12345
            That is the same combination as my luggage!

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Nysoz View Post

              12345
              You better believe I looked this up to see if it was a real code. It's not. But 01234 is; "anesthesia for open procedures involving upper two thirds of the femur, radical resection."

              Most of the time when a patient changes physicians like this, it's a blessing. . .

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Sundance View Post
                I cared about similar things when I was at your stage.

                Now I couldn’t care less. So I would echo others in saying don’t worry about it and move on.

                oh and if you ask why you might learn about all the nasty things that patient thought of you. Sometimes best for your mental health not to ask
                Or it might be good to get some honest feedback. I realize I’m not close to the same profession, but getting feedback that helped me see the client’s or employee’s POV has been probably the most useful advice over my career. I’ve learned far more from those encounters than from CPE and preparing tax returns. Unfortunately, it’s always uncomfortable for the other party and, in these days of avoiding the sin of hurt feelings, rather rare. You have to be willing to NOT make excuses for your behavior and be able to discern what is the patient’s personal problem from what is sincere feedback to reflect upon, whether meant for that reason or not, but you’ll learn to do it. Being able to see yourself as others do and make appropriate changes, where called for, is priceless, and a quality to work on. And can be extremely humbling, so be prepared.
                Our passion is protecting clients and others from predatory advisors. Fox & Co CPAs, Fox & Co Wealth Mgmt. 270-247-6087

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by JWeb View Post

                  You better believe I looked this up to see if it was a real code. It's not. But 01234 is; "anesthesia for open procedures involving upper two thirds of the femur, radical resection."

                  Most of the time when a patient changes physicians like this, it's a blessing. . .
                  Password1$
                  Meets most of the enhanced security requirements. Upper and lower case, number and special character. High probability you can hack the bank account as well.


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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Redemption View Post
                    Hi everyone,

                    I wanted to tell everyone a story to see what your thoughts were. I took care of a patient for issues "X" including (a) ordering a CT and reviewing the results with the patient (b) giving abx and steroids which temporize his symptoms and makes him feel much better (c) had 3 office visits with the patient examining him and explaining why he need surgery.

                    After 3 weeks, I realize he never followed up. I open up his chart and see that 5 days after seeing me the 3rd time he saw a senior partner in my group (there are about 25 of us) and scheduled surgery.

                    I am just out of training so I understand where the patient is coming from. But I am more upset at the senior partner for (a) booking the patient without telling me he was basically taking over the care (b) not supporting me and telling the patient to go back to me for the surgery I had already suggested he get.

                    Just really not cool move by my senior partner. I wish he would have called me to at least let me know why he was taking over care. I know there is probably nothing to do but bite the bullet, but does anyone have any advice?
                    OP, this used to bother me quite a bit when I first started out. There's this mantra in residency that your patients are your patients, and you're responsibility for them. It was a little kick in the gut when I managed them medically, put up with all their anxiety, and they just go off and have surgery with a senior partner. Now, it's kind of a blessing in disguise. If they go see someone else an I'm convinced that I did a good job of managing them, then they're probably not someone I want to deal with.

                    In fact, some patients are now coming to see me for surgery after being managed by others (both junior and senior partners). If I'm convinced that the original doc is doing a good job of managing the patient, then I will do what I can to send them back unless they're being referred by a family member or a friend. And if they're my patient and they even hint at a 2nd opinion, I am readily willing to provide them with a list of names. I think these folks that shop around on random online medical reviews are full of unnecessary trouble.

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                    • #25
                      The best patients are those who are referrals from someone you have previously cared for.

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                      • #26
                        OP, this also used to bother me when I was early in my practice. But now I don't care.

                        The ones that used to bug me were the ones who all along wanted to see another oncologist but could not get in sooner because of a waiting time of 2 weeks or so and would come to me, have a rapid work up using the resources of my staff arranging all the scans and biopsies and then go to the other oncologist, having the work up handed to him on a platter and start chemo. That really made me mad. But then my 6th sense antenna picked up when I could sense a patient was trying to pull a fast one on me and we did not fall for such traps any more.

                        OP, in your case the fault with the senior partner was not the stealing but not having the courtesy to call or text you to let you know that the patient preferred him because of experience and nothing more, and hope that you would not mind. He did not have that decency.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Kamban View Post
                          The ones that used to bug me were the ones who all along wanted to see another oncologist but could not get in sooner because of a waiting time of 2 weeks or so and would come to me, have a rapid work up using the resources of my staff arranging all the scans and biopsies and then go to the other oncologist, having the work up handed to him on a platter and start chemo. That really made me mad. But then my 6th sense antenna picked up when I could sense a patient was trying to pull a fast one on me and we did not fall for such traps any more.
                          I know you said "6th sense" but am curious if there's anything in particular that suggests the patient is trying to pull a fast one.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Tuxedo View Post

                            I know you said "6th sense" but am curious if there's anything in particular that suggests the patient is trying to pull a fast one.
                            After some time you get to know which patients are worried about their diagnosis and want to hear about it and discuss about its treatments and those that are not too interested in their diagnosis or treatment but only want certain testing like CT/ PET scans and biopsies done within a very short time. Both my MA and I can sense who these patients are and they get very upset if there is even a slightest delay of one or two days. We are not going to drop everything else so that we can be on the phone with their insurance getting preapprovals and with radiology trying to schedule them in a day.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Hatton View Post
                              The best patients are those who are referrals from someone you have previously cared for.
                              It really is the best compliment a patient can give, however, I do feel some extra pressure to ensure a good outcome and high satisfaction because they presumably have high expectations. I'm not sure if this is the right mindset but it does nag at me a bit.

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                              • #30
                                Reading through this thread, what strikes me is the gulf between what physicians assume patients know (or maybe you don't) and what patients actually know and understand. The patient who was the motivation for starting this thread probably had no clue that the newer doctor was doing a lot of work for free and the experienced doctor was making an easier buck. The patients Kamban just posted about doubtful considered or were aware of the work that goes on behind the scenes to schedule a test. I realize we all should be better consumers and know how hospitals and doctors' offices are run, but I doubt many without a family member in medicine do. I don't know the answer to this, just providing some personal perspective. Perhaps the front office people could give a little more guidance to patients when they schedule an appointment, spend a couple of minutes talking to them about expectations rather than approaching the patient relationship as an equal partnership with full disclosure.

                                The only typical disclosure I'm aware of is to tell the patient to give permission to release my medical history. And that is so frustrating, as if the only thing that matters is the office's CYA, not my understanding of what I am about to participate in. Honestly, to the patient, a doctor's visit is far more than getting patients in and out every 10 or 20 minutes. I realize both sides have to compromise somewhat and that there is an unseen 3rd party (the insurance co) but I also understand why people go the concierge route. Nothing against you guys who posted, please know, just general and somewhat random musings.
                                Our passion is protecting clients and others from predatory advisors. Fox & Co CPAs, Fox & Co Wealth Mgmt. 270-247-6087

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