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Lawyer Benefit Via Work Pro's vs. Con's

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  • Lawyer Benefit Via Work Pro's vs. Con's

    I have the option of a benefit via work to access a lawyer for routine legal matters. I need to make a will, POA, maybe even consider trusts and such and it seems like those services are covered. It is through a company called ARAG. For the benefits, I would pay less than $200/year which seems kinda cheap. Does anyone have experience with this? Or is it better to save my money and find someone who is reputable to do this locally? Any experiences with this would be helpful if you have done this before. Thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by shayanbruin View Post
    I have the option of a benefit via work to access a lawyer for routine legal matters. I need to make a will, POA, maybe even consider trusts and such and it seems like those services are covered. It is through a company called ARAG. For the benefits, I would pay less than $200/year which seems kinda cheap. Does anyone have experience with this? Or is it better to save my money and find someone who is reputable to do this locally? Any experiences with this would be helpful if you have done this before. Thanks.
    The services are real, but limited to specific tasks. One thing they don't do is provide actually planning. Additional charge.
    They will walk through a perfectly fine check list for example for a will with a trust for the kids. Presto, you will get a perfectly fine document.
    The way they work is the ARAG (never used) actually farms out via a fixed rate for the standard tasks. You will get perfectly good advice or documents. You will not get planning etc. unless you engage outside of the contact. The attorney gets paid by the service. Of course the quality is based on the attorney, but this is actually practicing attorney's that simply picking up some contract work. The quality was fine. Read the limitations and exclusions.

    Typically, only one face to face meeting to sign the documents and notarize if needed.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Tim View Post

      The services are real, but limited to specific tasks. One thing they don't do is provide actually planning. Additional charge.
      They will walk through a perfectly fine check list for example for a will with a trust for the kids. Presto, you will get a perfectly fine document.
      The way they work is the ARAG (never used) actually farms out via a fixed rate for the standard tasks. You will get perfectly good advice or documents. You will not get planning etc. unless you engage outside of the contact. The attorney gets paid by the service. Of course the quality is based on the attorney, but this is actually practicing attorney's that simply picking up some contract work. The quality was fine. Read the limitations and exclusions.

      Typically, only one face to face meeting to sign the documents and notarize if needed.
      Thanks. That is helpful. I see the list of covered services and it seems extensive but I can see how that can be basic.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by shayanbruin View Post
        I have the option of a benefit via work to access a lawyer for routine legal matters. I need to make a will, POA, maybe even consider trusts and such and it seems like those services are covered. It is through a company called ARAG. For the benefits, I would pay less than $200/year which seems kinda cheap. Does anyone have experience with this? Or is it better to save my money and find someone who is reputable to do this locally? Any experiences with this would be helpful if you have done this before. Thanks.
        I used my employer’s legal plan. I had the option of choosing between a variety of lawyers. Ended up getting a will, POA, living revocable trust etc for $200. I’m not a lawyer so I can’t really speak to the quality of the work, but from a cursory view it all looks great. The nice thing about these services via work is that you could also unenroll at the next open enrollment.

        So for me, I got a will, POA and trust for $200 - 10/10 would do again.

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        • #5
          We specifically used this under my spouse’s plan.
          My spouse had strong feelings about my estate going to her, then 50/50 to our two children, with the clause that if one passed, the other would receive 100%. Both are single.
          What she specifically wanted to cut out was future spouse and future children, if one child predeceased, the remaining would receive 100%. Emotional choice, but the attorney was very very tactful in explaining that a trust was possible, the options and that she only had authority over her will. Not mine, nor that of her children. Very helpful in dealing with her desires, the limits and disadvantages etc. We had 3 calls and received guidance, not what I would call a cookie cutter. Uniquely tailored as she wanted.
          Financial and healthcare POA’s and we declined the revocable trust.
          Huge value. The plans cover immediate family individuals as well.
          Huge value for us. Would 100% recommend.

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          • #6
            We did this for the year we planned to set up a trust. We paid extra for our trust but it was discounted. I think in the end we paid $1k for the trust, POA, and healthcare directive when from what I saw here it would have cost quite a bit more. I’d do it

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            • #7
              I did this, I think with the same company. The lawyer that I was assigned to told me that they pay him a minimal fee to set up my will and then tried to sell me more of his services like filling out a health care proxy or power of attorney. I don't think that I had the trust or other things included in the insurance package. I just declined and got my free will.

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